Klazath, God of War

“WAR IS NECESSARY

CREATION IS CONFLICT

BATTLE IS ETERNAL”

This time in our series of deity writeups for DCC we have Klazath, God of War.

Man, I had trouble with this one.

First of all, a lawful war deity seems reaaally contradictory to me to begin with. Secondly, what’s more boring than “a god of war”? If it’s been made into a mainstream video game it’s really hard to pull yourself away from the usual tropes of Mars, Ares, Thor and what have you… And third, I’d sort of written myself into a knot with my pantheon: my version of Ulesh, the God of Peace (available here) is a former war god, and quite formidable on his own. I didn’t want to revisit the same themes, but still had to take into account the relationship between the deities while generating this one.

So, here is Klazath: all of the war-god tropes pushed into a single piece of bulky, animated armor. Should be weird enough for DCC, right?

Cheers,

AMP

Klazath, God of War: DCC_Deity_Klazath_AMP

Banner art by the strategic Joni Kesti.

Alternate Birth Augurs

“Sometimes the time is right and stars align, casting a fortuitous path before a traveler.

At others, the time is wrong and stars are miscast, bringing despair and misfortune.

Mostly though, nothing special happens.”

I’ve always quite liked the birth augur and lucky roll system in DCC. We’ve more or less always just applied a bonus into the lucky effect (either +1 or 0-level Luck modifier, whichever is higher).

We did try out just applying the raw Luck modifier as is, but that created the problem of the lucky roll not meaning anything (if Luck mod was set at +0) or significantly hindering characters (in the case or negative Luck modifiers). I don’t like making meaningless rolls, and I find that player’s get more excited to start roleplaying a character with a minor bonus to some obscure thing.

Last summer I took part in a Lamentations of the Flame Princess -campaign which used a background table to flesh out characters to begin with: the gamemaster asked us little questions, the answers to which determined small bonuses and gave us an idea about the character’s nature before we started properly adventuring. In the “steal, beg and borrow” tradition of game design, here’s my take on a similar system. The rules in the PDF are intended to replace the birth augur table in the DCC rulebook.

Cheers,

AMP

Alternate birth augurs and auspicious events: DCC_AlternateAugurs_AMP

A Noble Soul

“Fate’s thread, re-weaved and knotted anew.”

I made this blade for the big season finale session a few weeks back. Most of the encounters and events of the game were callbacks to stuff that happened during earlier in the campaign, and the Noble Soul is no different: I wanted to pay homage to one of the first fatalities we had in DCC, back when we started a few years ago.

This is a fairly traditional take on the “talking sword” -trope. The main downside for the item is that it can be pretty damn irritating: I have an inkling that my players may end up throwing it into ravine or something fairly soon, just to get away from the incessant encouragement.

You may also notice that we’re in the process of revamping the site’s style and expanding to a number of social media outlets. This is an ongoing process, and any feedback would obviously be welcome.

Cheers,

AMP

DCC artefact: DCC_Artefact_NobleSoul_AMP