Attribute increase upon levelling up

In the DCC campaigns I have run PC attribute loss has been somewhat frequent. Whether through bleeding out, fumbling Spellburn, suffering the effects of a given module’s monster special attacks etc., I have found it commonplace for the PC’s to suffer permanent attribute loss.

So what, one might ask? Well, since I tend not to run DCC as an end in itself, but rather as the core for a homebrew “general brilliant d20 system”, I have in my omniscience decided to adopt certain game mechanics from e.g. D&D 5E (which seems suspiciously close to DCC…mere coincidence or a potenital lawsuit?). Yet, at the same time, I embrace the vanilla rules’ admonition for the PC’s to QUEST for desired attribute increasal.

However this, then, is my risibly simple system: upon attaining levels 2,4,6,8 and 10, the player may elect one of their character’s attributes to increase by one. An in-game reason for this should be provided, otherwise the attribute selection is up to Judge fiat.

Mechanically speaking, the afore-mentioned increasal is quite neglible. BUT it enables the players to feel good about themselves…

Divine Pestilence

“Tha’ stranger what rode through town last night weren’t all good! My Jason says ‘e saw the man spew a buncha live frogs outta ‘is mouth! I tells ya, we better pray ta Nimlurun that such disease won’t strike us down as well!”

Divinely sourced disease is a common event in old stories, and as DCC tends to often be fairly deity-centric, I ended up needing a set of pestilences strange and unpleasant enough to fit such a use in-game. Our cleric of Malotoch is off to the Purple Planet on a quest at the moment, to heal themselves of the dreaded flakeflesh…

Cheers,

AMP

DCC Rules – Divine Diseases

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Illustration by the always wholesome Joni Kesti.

Permanent Injuries

Drawing from years of experience working at different nursing homes, as well as being inspired by games like Battle Brothers, Blood Bowl and Darkest Dungeon to name a few, I have tried to create rules that are both realistic and fun to use, adding a level of madness and gore to my favorite RPG.

Coming in effect only after a character has been dealt a fatal blow, I have found them quite manageable and don’t feel they bog the game down with too many rules or decisions during combat.

In my current campaign, none have died so far, but have been saved from bleeding out quite a lot. One of the PCs are now carrying three permanent injuries, giving him ample ideas for playing his character, without rendering him useless, but wearing his scars with some pride. At least the physical ones.

Try them, you might find you like it!

Stay safe!

Vegard Stokke

DCC Rules – Permanent Injuries

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Article illustration: Theodor Kittelsen – Fattigmannnen (the Pauper), 1894-95.

Alternate Birth Augurs

“Sometimes the time is right and stars align, casting a fortuitous path before a traveler.

At others, the time is wrong and stars are miscast, bringing despair and misfortune.

Mostly though, nothing special happens.”

I’ve always quite liked the birth augur and lucky roll system in DCC. We’ve more or less always just applied a bonus into the lucky effect (either +1 or 0-level Luck modifier, whichever is higher).

We did try out just applying the raw Luck modifier as is, but that created the problem of the lucky roll not meaning anything (if Luck mod was set at +0) or significantly hindering characters (in the case or negative Luck modifiers). I don’t like making meaningless rolls, and I find that player’s get more excited to start roleplaying a character with a minor bonus to some obscure thing.

Last summer I took part in a Lamentations of the Flame Princess -campaign which used a background table to flesh out characters to begin with: the gamemaster asked us little questions, the answers to which determined small bonuses and gave us an idea about the character’s nature before we started properly adventuring. In the “steal, beg and borrow” tradition of game design, here’s my take on a similar system. The rules in the PDF are intended to replace the birth augur table in the DCC rulebook.

Cheers,

AMP

DCC Alternate Augurs

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Judge AMP’s Shortlist of House Rulings

“I ‘eard tell that there’s worlds somewhere out there, where stuff works different…

That’s a scary thought, innit?”

Rulings, not rules.

That’s been my guideline for gamemastering for as long as I can remember. And after running DCC for 2-ish years, I decided to take stock of what I’ve tweaked in the game.

What follows is a compilation of our house rulings. At the end of the document you can find some endnotes, explaining some of the history and logic behind the decisions I’ve made.

Feedback would be most welcome, I hope this sparks discussion. How do you run your worlds?

Cheers,

AMP

Judge AMP’s Shortlist of House Rulings

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Illustration by the law-abiding Joni Kesti.

A System for 20 PC Levels

Especially new players to DCC RPG sometimes complain about their perceived “too slow” character progression or the long intervals between levelling up. Here I offer a (largely illusionary) solution to silence them.

My system boils down to giving the PCs a chance of increasing one of their Ability scores (plus a few extra HPs) upon attaining “pseudolevels” situated between the 10 regular class levels of DCC RPG. This system does not require any modifications to the game mechanics, but Judges should alter it to better fit their gaming style/campaign. Continue reading “A System for 20 PC Levels”