Permanent Injuries

Drawing from years of experience working at different nursing homes, as well as being inspired by games like Battle Brothers, Blood Bowl and Darkest Dungeon to name a few, I have tried to create rules that are both realistic and fun to use, adding a level of madness and gore to my favorite RPG.

Coming in effect only after a character has been dealt a fatal blow, I have found them quite manageable and don’t feel they bog the game down with too many rules or decisions during combat.

In my current campaign, none have died so far, but have been saved from bleeding out quite a lot. One of the PCs are now carrying three permanent injuries, giving him ample ideas for playing his character, without rendering him useless, but wearing his scars with some pride. At least the physical ones.

Try them, you might find you like it!

Stay safe!

Vegard Stokke

Permanent injury rules for DCC: DCC_Rules_PermanentInjuries_ 1.1_VS

Article illustration: Theodor Kittelsen – Fattigmannnen (the Pauper), 1894-95.

Alternate Birth Augurs

“Sometimes the time is right and stars align, casting a fortuitous path before a traveler.

At others, the time is wrong and stars are miscast, bringing despair and misfortune.

Mostly though, nothing special happens.”

I’ve always quite liked the birth augur and lucky roll system in DCC. We’ve more or less always just applied a bonus into the lucky effect (either +1 or 0-level Luck modifier, whichever is higher).

We did try out just applying the raw Luck modifier as is, but that created the problem of the lucky roll not meaning anything (if Luck mod was set at +0) or significantly hindering characters (in the case or negative Luck modifiers). I don’t like making meaningless rolls, and I find that player’s get more excited to start roleplaying a character with a minor bonus to some obscure thing.

Last summer I took part in a Lamentations of the Flame Princess -campaign which used a background table to flesh out characters to begin with: the gamemaster asked us little questions, the answers to which determined small bonuses and gave us an idea about the character’s nature before we started properly adventuring. In the “steal, beg and borrow” tradition of game design, here’s my take on a similar system. The rules in the PDF are intended to replace the birth augur table in the DCC rulebook.

Cheers,

AMP

Alternate birth augurs and auspicious events: DCC_AlternateAugurs_AMP

Tinmen

It was just a jumble of tubes and screws and metal plates. But the group decided to fuel it with the blood of their dead and take it with them. And thus, I had to write the following rules for the rickety race of tinmen. They are a weird bunch but should provide some tank-y power in combat and some useful utility skills for the group.

Have fun!

– VIR

The race of tinmen: DCC_Tinmen_VIR

Character sheet for tinmen: DCC_TinmanSheet_AMP

A System for 20 PC Levels

Especially new players to DCC RPG sometimes complain about their perceived “too slow” character progression or the long intervals between levelling up. Here I offer a (largely illusionary) solution to silence them.

My system boils down to giving the PCs a chance of increasing one of their Ability scores (plus a few extra HPs) upon attaining “pseudolevels” situated between the 10 regular class levels of DCC RPG. This system does not require any modifications to the game mechanics, but Judges should alter it to better fit their gaming style/campaign. Continue reading “A System for 20 PC Levels”

Full Body Hit Locations

“Hey, while adventuring, you’re likely to get hurt. Like HURT hurt. Real bad. You sure you’re up for it?”

A while back, I came across this image:

It reminded me of a hit location table I made for a Runequest-based game I used to run years back. (Apparently the above image is from the Wellcome Collection, CC 4.0 International license, link here).

So I figured that I’d make an updated version of the old image, with a little more design applied. It’s a 2d20 full-body table, and it has been approximately optimized so that most attacks hit the arms or the torso. Have a look, try it out. Continue reading “Full Body Hit Locations”